Japanese compensated dating

Tokyo - Japan must do more to stop child abuse, and especially the exploitation of young girls working in entertainment cafes across the country, according to a UN official.

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Mai, a student, is working part-time promoting a so-called joshi kosei, or high-school girl cafe, in Tokyo's Akihabara district, where adult men pay to sit and chat with teenage girls.

"Some of the men are my grandpa's age, and I do sometimes get short of things to talk about," Mai, dressed in her school uniform, told Al Jazeera. Also, they need to be smart," Koichiro Fukuyama, the cafe owner, told Al Jazeera.

In October, Maud de Boer-Buquicchio, the UN's special rapporteur on child prostitution and pornography, angered Japan's government by saying that up to 13 percent of schoolgirls had taken part in Enjo Kosai, or compensated dating.

She said later that the figure was not official, and would not be in her final report.

Earlier the offered service was known as a "refresh business".

When police began investigations into the practice of "JK"; the "sanpo business" arose. State Department has reported that the Government of Japan "does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking," and "continues to facilitate the prostitution of Japanese children." Cultural anthropologists have described Japan as having a shame culture, creating a barrier for teenage runaways to be reunited with their families, making them vulnerable to recruiting into the underage sex industry.

In its most recent report on international human rights practices, the State Department noted concerns about the sexual exploitation of children in Japan, saying that “compensated dating” in particular facilitates the sex trafficking of children.

, probably isn’t new to anyone in the Western world, right now in Japan, girls hoping to capitalize on their good looks and companionship are flocking to find middle-aged men who are open to becoming their mentors — as long as they have a steady bank account, that is.

But campaigners argue the lack of official figures is itself a sign of complacency by Japanese authorities.

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